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Diplomacy sought on 2 fronts over Iran nukes

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By The Associated Press
Wednesday, Dec. 12, 2012, 9:34 p.m.
 

VIENNA — International officials pursued a two-pronged effort Wednesday to engage Iran over concerns the country may have worked on nuclear weapons, with a U.N. team seeking access to a site linked to such suspected activity and European Union negotiators looking to restart talks with Tehran meant to ease such fears.

Preparing to depart Vienna for Tehran, Herman Nackaerts of the International Atomic Energy Agency signaled impatience with Iran's refusal to meet IAEA requests for information on its suspicion that the Islamic republic had researched and developed components of a nuclear weapons program. In brief comments, he noted “negotiations for almost one year” have already been conducted on the issue.

Nackaerts, who heads the IAEA's nuclear investigation, said his team was “ready to go” to Parchin, an Iranian site it suspects could have been used for such experiments, just as soon as Tehran approves a visit. In Tehran, he will push IAEA requests for access to information, officials and locations the agency suspects of use for weapons work.

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