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Israeli foreign minister indicted

AFP/Getty Images
Israel Minister for Foreign Affairs Avigdor Lieberman speaks to party members during a gathering in Tel Aviv on December 13, 2012. Israel's attorney general charged Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman with fraud and breach of trust, barely five weeks before a snap election, but dropped more serious allegations against him. AFP PHOTO/RONI SCHUTZER ==ISRAEL OUT==RONI SCHUTZER/AFP/Getty Images

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, Dec. 13, 2012, 7:16 p.m.
 

JERUSALEM — Israel's powerful foreign minister was charged on Thursday with breach of trust for actions that allegedly compromised a criminal investigation into his business dealings, throwing the country's election campaign into disarray just weeks before the vote.

While Avigdor Lieberman was cleared of more serious allegations, the indictment sparked immediate calls for the politician to step down. He declined to do so during a news conference but said he would consult with his lawyers on what to do next.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu rallied behind his close ally as Lieberman denied any wrongdoing, calling the investigation against him a witch hunt.

“According to my legal counsel, I do not have to resign,” Lieberman told cheering supporters at a campaign rally. “At the end of the day, I will make a final decision together with my lawyers.”

Lieberman, a native of Moldova, is head of Yisrael Beitenu, an ultranationalist party that is popular with immigrants from the former Soviet Union. With a tough-talking message that has questioned the loyalty of Israel's Arab minority, criticized the Palestinians and confronted Israel's foreign critics, he has become an influential voice in Israeli politics, even while sometimes alienating Israel's allies.

Yisrael Beitenu and Netanyahu's Likud Party recently joined forces and are running together on a joint list in the Jan. 22 parliamentary elections. Opinion polls have predicted they would form the largest bloc in parliament and lead a new coalition government.

Thursday's decision threatened to become a distraction during the campaign. Lieberman gave no time frame for deciding on his political future but said he would consider whether the indictment was harming support for his party in the election.

 

 
 


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