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Suspect in attack freed

| Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2013, 9:12 p.m.

TUNIS, Tunisia — Tunisian authorities released one of the only men in custody for alleged links to September's attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in the Libyan city of Benghazi, the latest blow to an investigation that has limped along for months.

Armed groups assaulted the lightly guarded mission on Sept. 11 and killed Ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, but despite U.S. promises, there has been little news of progress so far in bringing the perpetrators to justice.

Ali Harzi, a 26-year-old Tunisian extradited from Turkey in October, was one of the only people actually detained in the attack, and at the time, Tunisian authorities said they “strongly suspected” he was involved.

On Tuesday, however, his lawyer, Anwar Oued-Ali, said the presiding judge had “conditionally freed” Harzi the night before for lack of evidence. He must remain in the Tunis area to be available for any further questioning.

William Lawrence, the North Africa analyst for the International Crisis Group, said while it was very possible that Harzi might have been involved with extremist groups in Benghazi, it was impossible to tell without more efforts from the Libyans.

“If there had been a better investigation in Benghazi, this guy's role in the whole thing would have been a lot clearer,” he said. “The fundamental issue is that the Libyans aren't prioritizing this.”

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