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Italian consul fired on in Benghazi

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By The Associated Press
Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013, 7:04 p.m.

Militants opened fire on the car of the Italian consul in the Libyan city of Benghazi, but he wasn't injured, officials in Rome and Libya said Saturday.

A security detail traveling with Consul Guido De Sanctis returned fire, but the gunmen who were driving in a car alongside De Sanctis' convoy sped away, a Libyan security official said. The shooting occurred in the evening as De Sanctis was leaving the consulate.

A government official in Rome said De Sanctis wasn't hurt because he was travelling in an armored car. Video footage shown on Sky TG24 showed several gunshots to the windows of the vehicle.

The officials insisted on not being identified. The ANSA news agency said it spoke to De Sanctis, who confirmed he was fine.

Benghazi was the site of the Sept. 11 attacks on U.S. missions that killed four Americans, including the U.S. ambassador to Libya.

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