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Iran claims it sent a monkey into space

| Monday, Jan. 28, 2013, 9:04 p.m.

TEHRAN — A gray-tufted monkey strapped in a pod resembling an infant's car seat rode an Iranian rocket into space and returned safely, officials said on Monday in what was described as a step toward Tehran's goal of a manned space flight.

The mission touched on concerns that advances in Iran's rocket expertise could be channeled into military use for long-range weapons that might one day carry nuclear warheads. Iran claims it does not seek atomic weapons.

Launching a live animal into space — as the U.S. and the Soviet Union did more than a half-century ago in the infancy of their programs — may boost a country's stature.

John Logsden, a space policy professor emeritus at George Washington University, said Iran's achievement should draw no concern.

“A slight monkey on a suborbital flight is nothing to get too excited about,” he said. “They already had the capability to launch warheads in their region.”

State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said the United States had no way to confirm the monkey's voyage, but that it was concerned because “any space launch vehicle capable of placing an object in orbit is directly relevant to the development of long-range ballistic missiles.”

The U.N. Security Council has expressly forbidden Iran from such ballistic missile activity, Nuland added.

In June 2010, the Security Council banned Iran from pursuing “any activity related to ballistic missiles capable of delivering nuclear weapons.”

With its ambitious aerospace program, Iran has said it wants to become a technological leader for the Islamic world.

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