TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Massive Chinese trade center in Mexico riles environmentalists, competitors

Daily Photo Galleries

By McClatchy Newspapers
Saturday, Feb. 2, 2013, 6:16 p.m.
 

MEXICO CITY — It's a big dream: A complex near the resort of Cancun that would be the largest trading center for Chinese products in the Western Hemisphere.

The proposed complex would house 3,040 showrooms, divided among 14 industrial sectors and targeting wholesalers from across Latin America. Projections estimate that it would draw 1 million people a year to a resort that already is the most popular beach destination in the Western Hemisphere.

But just one month ahead of its expected groundbreaking, the $180 million Dragon Mart Cancun is drawing loud objections from an odd alliance of Mexican environmentalists, who worry about the predicted surge in visitors, and business interests, who fear competition from inexpensive Chinese imports.

“We categorically and overwhelmingly oppose the initiative to install a Dragon Mart on our national territory,” the Confederation of Industrial Chambers of Mexico, the nation's largest industrial group, said in a December statement.

The group said it was worried about China's past practices of “under invoicing, fake receipts, price subsidies, weak tax collection, almost null labor requirements and zero commitment to the environment.”

“The project may represent a beachhead for the massive arrival of Chinese products in conditions of unfair trade that may affect national industry and production chains,” the group added.

A business-supported think tank, the Center for Economic Studies of the Private Sector, said last week that it agreed with those concerns. It noted in a statement that China has chalked up 643 anti-dumping complaints through mid-2012, more than any other member of the World Trade Organization. Mexico has lodged 19 of those complaints.

It called on authorities to conduct “a serious and urgent investigation” of the business plan of Dragon Mart Cancun to ensure that competition will be fair.

Already, the overseers of Dragon Mart Cancun have made concessions. For one, Juan Carlos Lopez, the director general of Dragon Mart Cancun, said the expo had decided to ban exhibits by Chinese sellers of shoes and clothing.

“These two industries are very sensitive in Mexico,” he said.

Another concession, Lopez said, is that the expo center will no longer be only for Chinese vendors but also for vendors from around the world.

If the project goes ahead as planned, it would follow the rough model of Dragon Mart Dubai, the first effort by Chinese business and industry to set up a showroom center abroad to promote Chinese products. Dragon Mart Dubai, which measures more than 1,300 yards from end to end, opened in 2004.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. Cease-fire between Israel, Hamas lasts mere 1.5 hours in Gaza Strip
  2. Air power given bigger role in China
  3. Brutality on video only part of the significance to Islamic State’s message
  4. Investigators collect remains, evidence from Malaysia Airlines Flight MH-17 crash site in Ukraine
  5. Uganda invalidates anti-gay law
  6. Tunisia closes borders with Libya to stem tide
  7. Argentina slips into financial quagmire
  8. Ebola viral disease prompts U.S. travel warning to West Africa
  9. 44 killed in Gaza; Israeli soldier feared captured
  10. Flight ban to Aruba lifted
  11. Fuel fire puts fight in Libya on hold
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.