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U.S. to heed Karzai's order on airstrikes

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Afghanistan is “a sovereign nation and the president is exercising sovereignty.”

Marine Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr.

commander of the US-led Nato forces

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By The Los Angeles Times
Sunday, Feb. 17, 2013, 7:24 p.m.
 

KABUL, Afghanistan — The commander of the U.S.-led coalition in Afghanistan said Sunday that his forces were prepared to comply with President Hamid Karzai's demand that Afghan forces stop requesting international airstrikes in residential areas.

Marine Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr. downplayed the impact of Karzai's directive, even though Afghanistan's fledgling security forces rely entirely on U.S. and NATO warplanes for air power against Taliban-led insurgents.

“We can continue to support the Afghan National Security Forces and meet the president's intent,” Dunford said.

On Saturday, in a speech at the Afghan National Military Academy, Karzai denounced an Afghan-NATO attack last week that local officials said killed 10 civilians, in addition to four Taliban commanders in eastern Kunar province.

The Afghan leader said he would issue a decree that “no Afghan military and security forces in any circumstances can ask for the foreigners' planes for carrying out operations in Afghanistan's homes and villages.”

The remarks represented the latest broadside by Karzai against the coalition that has trained, equipped and financed the force of 350,000 soldiers and police who are due to take responsibility for Afghanistan's security later this year.

Civilian casualties have long been a point of contention between Karzai and the coalition, although NATO forces in recent months have implemented rules limiting airstrikes in populated areas. U.S. officials say that civilian casualties in coalition operations fell 49 percent from 2011 to 2012 and that the number of children killed or wounded in air operations fell nearly 40 percent.

“We have constraints and restraints on each operation” to minimize civilian casualties, Dunford said.

Last week, Karzai summoned Dunford to explain the Kunar attack. The coalition has declined to discuss the incident, saying only that it was investigating the reports of civilian deaths.

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