TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Romeo, Frankenstein and Hitler running for election in India

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Friday, Feb. 22, 2013, 9:48 p.m.
 

GAUHATI, India — Adolf Hitler is running for election in India. So is Frankenstein.

India's tiny northeast city in the state of Meghalaya has a special fascination for interesting and sometimes controversial names — and the ballot for state elections on Saturday is proof.

Among the 345 contestants running for the state assembly are Frankenstein Momin; Billykid Sangma; Field Marshal Mawphniang; and Romeo Rani. Some, such as Kenedy Marak, Kennedy Cornelius Khyriem and Jhim Carter Sangma, are clearly hoping for the electoral success of their namesake American presidents.

Then there is Hitler.

This 54-year-old father of three has won three elections to the state assembly with little controversy over being named after the Nazi dictator.

His father worked with the British army, but apparently developed enough of a fascination with Great Britain's archenemy to name his son Adolf Hitler — though he also gave him the middle name Lu, said Hitler.

“I am aware at one point of time Adolf Hitler was the most hated person on Earth for the genocide of the Jews. But my father added ‘Lu' in between, naming me Adolf Lu Hitler, and that's why I am different,” Hitler said.

Hitler said his name hasn't stopped him from traveling the world, including to the United States and Germany.

“I never had problems obtaining a visa, but I was asked many times during immigration as to why I should have such a name. I told the immigration staff I possibly didn't have a role in my naming,” he said.

India played hardly any role in World War II, and many Indians view Hitler not as the personification of evil but as a figure of fascination. Hitler's book “Mein Kampf” is prominently displayed in many bookstores.

Musfika Haq, a teacher in Meghalaya's capital of Shillong, said such names are common in the state.

“Parents obviously get fascinated by names of well-known or great leaders, but must be unaware that some of them, like Hitler, had been highly controversial,” he said.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. NATO proclaims ‘strong solidarity’ with Turkey against IS
  2. Gunbattle kills 21 at Afghan wedding party
  3. U.S., Turkey plan for ‘safe zone’ free of ISIS in northern Syria
  4. Boehner vows to do ‘everything possible’ to scuttle Iran nuclear deal
  5. Turkey to stick with air offensive in ISIS battle