| USWorld

Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Islamist terror group gives car-torching tips online

Email Newsletters

Sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

By Reuters
Saturday, March 2, 2013, 7:15 p.m.

Al Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), the Islamist movement's most active branch, has released an English-language magazine advising militants on how to torch parked cars and cause traffic accidents.

The magazine, released on militant websites, warns France to pull back from Mali and lists 11 public figures in the West, including novelist Salman Rushdie, who it says are “wanted dead or alive for crimes against Islam.”

AQAP, based in the impoverished, lawless state of Yemen, has plotted to bring down international airliners and is seen by Western governments as a danger to oil-producing Gulf states and crude shipment routes.

In a section titled “open source jihad,” the magazine gives tips on how to set fire to parked cars, including advice such as “don't get petrol on yourself,” and suggests spilling oil on road bends to cause crashes.

An editorial in the magazine warned France to end its military intervention in Mali, citing the U.S. experiences in Afghanistan and Iraq, which it said made “them bite their fingertips in regret.”

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.



Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. Russian pilot rescued by Syrian commando unit
  2. Putin sends air defense missiles to Syria to deter Turkey
  3. ISIS claims hotel attack in Egypt
  4. Turkey shoots down Russian jet it says violated its airspace
  5. Liberia has 1st Ebola death since being deemed free of disease in September
  6. Tunisia put under state of emergency
  7. Official: Paris attacks organizer was planning more carnage
  8. Social media drives Cuban exodus to United States
  9. At least 20 killed after jihadists attack Malian hotel
  10. Italian journalists’ books broaden Vatican scandal of greed, corruption
  11. Pakistani doctor who led CIA to bin Laden stuck in prison