TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Autopsy report on boy who died in Texas triggers protest in Russia

AP
Demonstrators hold portraits of adopted Russian children who died in the United States during a huge rally in Moscow on Saturday, March 2. AP

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Washington Post
Saturday, March 2, 2013, 6:36 p.m.
 

MOSCOW — Many Russians remained suspicious on Saturday about the circumstances surrounding the death in Texas of an adopted 3-year-old despite an autopsy report that determined he died accidentally.

Max Shatto, who was born Maxim Kuzmin in Russia, died Jan. 21 from a torn artery in the abdomen, officials said at a news conference Friday in Odessa, Texas. Four pathologists — three employed by the county medical examiner and one independent — agreed the death was an accident, Ector County District Attorney Bobby Bland told reporters.

Pro-Kremlin groups rallied in central Moscow to back the ban on U.S. adoptions of Russian children and call for more adoptions by Russian parents. Protesters held signs with pictures of adopted Russian children who died in the United States in recent years and wore ribbons in the colors of the Russian flag with slogans demanding Max's half-brother Kirill be returned to Russia.

“Today, people are telling us that Maxim supposedly maimed himself to death with a blunt instrument and damaged his own internal organs. That's a slap in the face of our country and our people,” Irina Bergset, one of the march's organizers, said in a speech at the rally.

Two weeks ago, Russian officials informed the public here about his death, saying Max had been abused and given psychiatric drugs. No evidence was presented, but that description quickly became an emotional element of anti-American rhetoric and colored the explosive question of adoptions.

“The bruises disappeared, the drugs vanished, the adoptive parents have been cleared, the authorities backtracked,” Pavel Astakhov, Russia's ombudsman for children, wrote on his Twitter account Saturday. “The 3-year-old boy fell victim to big politics.”

Russia imposed a ban on adoptions by Americans in December, accusing U.S. parents of widespread mistreatment.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. Comets hold life building blocks
  2. Al-Qaida group in Syria targeted by U.S.-led coalition airstrikes
  3. Senate to grill United Nations agency chief Amano on Iran nuclear pact
  4. Experimental Ebola vaccine could stop virus in West Africa
  5. ISIS suspected in abduction of Indian citizens in Libya
  6. Firebombing kills Palestinian toddler, wounds family; Jewish settlers blamed
  7. Escaped Mexican drug lord no saint, but lesser evil at home
  8. Turkey to stick with air offensive in ISIS battle
  9. Former Omar deputy to lead Afghan Taliban
  10. Surfer seriously injured in Australian shark attack
  11. Dissension cracks Taliban leadership