Share This Page

Carnival Dream cruise ship's stranded passengers fly home

| Thursday, March 14, 2013, 9:45 p.m.

PHILIPSBURG, St. Maarten — Passengers from the cruise ship Carnival Dream headed to the airport on Thursday instead of sailing home as an on-board generator problem halted their trip in the latest maintenance headache for the world's largest cruise line.

The Dream was in St. Maarten on the final stop of a Caribbean cruise when the crew announced it would not be sailing home to Port Canaveral, Fla., because of a mechanical issue with a diesel generator, passengers said.

Carnival Cruise Lines said the Dream had a “technical issue” with its backup emergency diesel generator that was discovered during a test on Wednesday.

A company statement said the ship did not lose power but that there were periodic interruptions to elevators and restrooms.

Carnival said all systems were functioning normally on Thursday, but the company decided to get the ship's passengers home by air.

Passengers strolling about the Dutch Caribbean town of Philipsburg said the power and water were out for 10 to 20 minutes, contradicting media reports of longer outages and unsanitary conditions.

“We have toilets. We have water. It's no different than a regular day at sea,” said Tasha Larson, 31, of Winston-Salem, N.C..

An engine fire last month crippled another Carnival ship, the Carnival Triumph, leaving 4,200 people stranded for five days without working toilets or power.

Passengers Mary and Terry Washington of Tampa said they were grateful because the malfunction gave them an additional day to spend in St. Maarten.

“The plumbing is fine. The food is fine. Everything is fine,” Mary Washington said.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.