TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Morsy follows through with his threat, issues arrests warrants for 5 activists

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By The Associated Press
Monday, March 25, 2013, 8:36 p.m.
 

CAIRO — After Egypt's Islamist president vowed action against opponents, the nation's top prosecutor on Monday issued arrest warrants against five prominent activists over clashes between the Muslim Brotherhood and protesters.

The warrants heightened the latest in a series of crises plaguing this nation of about 90 million since the ouster of autocrat Hosni Mubarak's ouster.

Rights activists and the opposition warned the warrants could mark the opening of an intimidation campaign against their ranks by President Mohamed Morsy and the Brotherhood, through the prosecutor. They accused the prosecutor — handpicked by Morsy late last year — saying he has ignored Morsy supporters' violence against protesters and moved quickly against opposition figures.

“We are extremely worried,” said Khaled Dawoud, a spokesman for the main opposition coalition, the National Salvation Front. “We feel threatened, and we expect the worst,” he said.

Egypt's ongoing tug of war pits Morsy, a Brotherhood veteran, and his Islamist allies in one camp against a mostly secular and liberal opposition backed by moderate Muslims, minority Christians and a large segment of women in the other.

The opposition charges that Morsy and the Brotherhood failed to tackle any of the nation's most pressing problems and are trying to monopolize power. Morsy blames the country's woes on nearly three decades of corruption under his predecessor, Hosni Mubarak, and accuses the opposition of stoking unrest.

Clashes on Friday outside the Brotherhood's headquarters were the worst in more than three months.

The violence was rooted in an incident a week earlier, when Brotherhood members slapped a woman to the ground and beat up other activists who were spray-painting graffiti against the group outside its headquarters, in an eastern district of Cairo. Several reporters at the scene were attacked, and the Brotherhood said they were part of the protest.

In response, anti-Brotherhood activists called for a protest there Friday to “restore dignity.” Both sides brought out hundreds of supporters.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. Comets hold life building blocks
  2. Al-Qaida branch in Syria threatens U.S.-backed forces
  3. Al-Qaida group in Syria targeted by U.S.-led coalition airstrikes
  4. Bin Laden relatives among crash casualties
  5. Vibrantly colored mural spread across 200 homes in central Mexico city
  6. Gunbattle kills 21 at Afghan wedding party
  7. Experimental Ebola vaccine could stop virus in West Africa
  8. China returns passport to artist Ai Weiwei, who plans London trip
  9. U.S., Turkey plan for ‘safe zone’ free of ISIS in northern Syria
  10. 2013 death of Taliban leader Mullah Omar confirmed
  11. Zimbabwe suspends hunts amid outcry over lion’s death