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Italian court overturns Knox's acquittal; American won't return for retrial in slaying, lawyer says

| Tuesday, March 26, 2013, 9:39 p.m.

ROME — It's not over yet for Amanda Knox.

Italy's top criminal court dealt a stunning setback on Tuesday to the 25-year-old college student, overturning her acquittal in the grisly murder of her British roommate and ordering her to stand trial again.

“She thought that the nightmare was over,” Knox's attorney, Carlo Dalla Vedova, told reporters minutes after conveying the unexpected turn of events to his client, who had stayed up to hear the ruling, which came shortly after 2 a.m. West Coast time. “But she's ready to fight.”

Now a student at the University of Washington in Seattle, Knox called the decision by the Rome-based Court of Cassation “painful” but said she was confident that she would be exonerated.

The American left Italy a free woman after her October 2011 acquittal — but only after serving nearly four years of a 26-year prison sentence from a lower court that convicted her of murdering Meredith Kercher. The 21-year-old exchange student's body was found in a pool of blood, her throat slit, in a bedroom of the house the two shared in Perugia, a university town 100 miles north of Rome.

Raffaele Sollecito, Knox's Italian boyfriend at the time, also was convicted of the Nov. 1, 2007, murder, then later acquitted. His acquittal was thrown out and a new trial ordered.

Italian law cannot compel Knox to return for the new trial, and Dalla Vedova said she had no plans to do so.

In any case, the judicial saga is likely to continue for years. It will be months before a date is set for the new trial.

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