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Nations urge inquiry on Syria's alleged chemical use

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By The Los Angeles Times
Thursday, April 18, 2013, 9:45 p.m.
 

Britain and France have asked the United Nations to investigate what they believe is credible evidence that the Syrian regime has used small amounts of chemical weapons in recent months, officials said on Thursday.

The evidence — including soil samples and witness testimony — is not definitive. But the concerns are such that “we are pressing the United Nations to investigate further and raising our concerns with international partners,” said a British diplomat who requested anonymity in addressing a sensitive matter.

President Obama has said any use of chemical weapons by Syria President Bashar Assad's regime would be a “game changer,” although he hasn't said how the United States would respond. Other U.S. officials have called it a “red line.”

The Pentagon's move to send about 200 troops to neighboring Jordan, disclosed by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel on Wednesday, gives the United States a military option if it decides one is warranted. The small force can pave the way for a rapid buildup of a much larger contingent.

A U.S. official, speaking on condition of anonymity in discussing intelligence matters, said there is no consensus within the U.S. intelligence community about the possible use of chemical weapons in Syria. “But there are growing concerns that chemical weapons may have been used ... in a limited way,” the official said.

Asked about the matter by members of the Senate Armed Services Committee, James R. Clapper, the director of national intelligence, said he could not discuss it in public.

“The increasingly beleaguered regime, having found that its escalation of violence through conventional means is not working, appears quite willing to use chemical weapons against its own people,” Clapper said.

“We receive many claims of chemical warfare use in Syria each day, and we take them all seriously, and we do all we can to investigate them. We can't provide additional details on these efforts in this setting to protect the fragile, critical intelligence we need to assess the situation, but we certainly — we can talk about this in closed session,” Clapper said.

Luxembourg, South Korea and Japan also have asked the United Nations to investigate, diplomats said.

Some diplomats believe Syria is testing the United States and its partners by using the weapons in small amounts to see what sort of response ensues.

An estimated 70,000 people have died in the Syrian conflict.

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