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Woman describes fear as food taster for Hitler

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By The Associated Press

Published: Saturday, April 27, 2013, 12:01 a.m.

BERLIN — They were feasts of sublime asparagus — laced with fear. And for more than half a century, Margot Woelk kept her secret hidden from the world, even from her husband. Then a few months after her 95th birthday, she revealed the truth about her wartime role: Adolf Hitler's food taster.

Woelk, then in her mid-20s, spent 21⁄2 years as one of 15 young women who sampled Hitler's food to make sure it was not poisoned before it was served to the Nazi leader in his “Wolf's Lair,” the heavily guarded command center in what is now Poland, where he spent much of his time in the final years of World War II.

“He was a vegetarian. He never ate any meat during the entire time I was there,” Woelk said. “And Hitler was so paranoid that the British would poison him — that's why he had 15 girls taste the food before he ate it himself.”

With many Germans contending with food shortages and a bland diet as the war dragged on, sampling Hitler's food had its advantages.

“The food was delicious, only the best vegetables, asparagus, bell peppers, everything you can imagine. And always with a side of rice or pasta,” she recalled. “But this constant fear — we knew of all those poisoning rumors and could never enjoy the food. Every day we feared it was going to be our last meal.”

The petite widow's story is a tale of the horror, pain and dislocation endured by people of all sides who survived World War II.

Only now in the sunset of her life has she been willing to relate her experiences, which she had buried because of shame and the fear of prosecution for having worked with the Nazis, although she insists she was never a party member. She told her story as she flipped through a photo album with pictures of her as a young woman, in the same Berlin apartment where she was born in 1917.

Woelk first revealed her secret to a local Berlin reporter a few months ago. Since then interest in her life story has been overwhelming.

Teachers wrote and asked her for photos and autographs to bring history alive for their students. Several researchers from a museum visited to ask for details about her life as Hitler's taster.

 

 
 


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