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Ex-first lady Marcos vies for Congress again

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By The Associated Press
Saturday, May 11, 2013, 12:01 a.m.
 

MARCOS, Philippines — Twenty-seven years after a public revolt ousted her dictator husband, Imelda Marcos is the Philippines' ultimate political survivor: She dazzled voters with her bouffant hairstyle, oversized jewelry and big talk on the campaign trail this week bidding to keep her seat in Congress.

Ferdinand Marcos' widow is widely expected to win in Monday's congressional polls.

Approaching 84, she is nearing the final chapter of a tumultuous political life in which she once astounded the world by amassing a mammoth shoe collection as first lady of the impoverished country. Never showing any remorse for her past, she has against all odds succeeded in orchestrating the rebirth of a political dynasty tainted by allegations of corruption and abuse during her husband's rule.

Despite her reputation for extravagance, Marcos twice ran unsuccessfully for president and won seats in the House on her return from exile.

She is campaigning for a second of a maximum three terms to represent Ilocos Norte, a vote-rich agricultural region.

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