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Commuter train crash kills 3, injures hundreds near Buenos Aires

AFP/Getty Images
Rescue workers are seen at the site of a commuter train crash in Castelar, some 30 kms west of Buenos Aires, on June 13, 2013. At least three people were killed and 70 injured on Thursday when a commuter train crashed west of Buenos Aires, according to the municipality of Moron, where the accident took place. AFP PHOTO/NA/Santiago PandolfiSANTIAGO PANDOLFI/AFP/Getty Images

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, June 13, 2013, 9:42 p.m.
 

BUENOS AIRES — A speeding commuter train slammed into another that had stopped between stations during the morning commute on Thursday in suburban Buenos Aires, killing three passengers and injuring more than 300 on a line that has been under government control since a deadly crash last year.

The state-run train agency dismissed possible brake failure as a cause and suggested that the conductor was at fault.

Satellite images show the train had braked normally at the previous station, and then rolled past four functioning warning signals without stopping before the crash, the agency said. “Before a warning signal, the conductor should completely stop the formation, a situation that did not happen.”

Instead, the train accelerated continually from the moment it left the previous station, reaching a speed of 38.5 mph on impact, Transportation Minister Florencio Randazzo said. That's three times faster than the speed on impact of the train that crunched into the downtown Once station on the same line in 2012, killing 51 passengers and injuring more than 700.

The conductors and their assistants on both of the trains involved in the crash were ordered detained by a judge for investigation on charges of “wreaking havoc followed by death,” the state news agency Telam reported.

Randazzo asked for patience and vowed that those found responsible will be punished. He said that the train workers passed alcohol breathalyzer tests before their shifts, a safety measure the government imposed after the previous crash.

“I feel rage, and impotence,” President Cristina Fernandez said, adding that she doesn't want to blame anyone in particular just yet. “I want the justice system to say what happened.”

Argentina's independent auditor general, Leandro Despouy, who delivered a blistering report on the causes of last year's crash, suggested that the problems are systemic, due to many years of mismanagement, corruption and disrepair.

“We've been warning that this tragedy could happen again,” Despouy told Radio de la Red. “Today it's a courageous move to travel by train.”

The train slammed into the back of another at 7:07 a.m. between the stations of Moron and Castelar on the Sarmiento line, which links the Argentine capital's densely populated western suburbs to the downtown Once station.

 

 
 


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