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U.S. and Cuba agree to resume migration talks

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By The Associated Press
Wednesday, June 19, 2013, 9:42 p.m.
 

HAVANA — The United States and Cuba have agreed to resume bilateral talks on migration issues next month, a State Department official said on Wednesday, the latest evidence of a thaw in chilly relations between the Cold War enemies.

Havana and Washington just wrapped up a round of separate negotiations aimed at restarting direct mail service, which has been suspended since 1963. Both sets of talks have been on hold in recent years in a dispute over the fate of U.S. government subcontractor Alan Gross, who is serving a 15-year jail sentence in Havana for bringing communications equipment onto the island illegally.

The migration talks will be held in Washington on July 17. The State Department official, who was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly, spoke on condition of anonymity.

“Representatives from the Department of State are scheduled to meet with representatives of the Cuban government to discuss migration issues,” the official said, adding that the talks were “consistent with our interest in promoting greater freedoms and respect for human rights in Cuba.”

Word of the jump-started talks sparked an angry reaction from Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, R-Fla., a Cuban-American who blasted the Obama administration for what she saw as a policy of appeasement.

“First we get news that the Obama State Department is speaking with a top Castro regime diplomat. Then comes the announcement that the administration is restarting talks with the dictatorship regarding direct mail between both countries,” Ros-Lehtinen said. “Now we hear that migration talks will be restarted. It's concession after concession from the Obama administration.”

Since taking office, President Obama has relaxed travel and remittance rules for Cuban Americans and made it far easier for others to visit the island for cultural, educational and religious reasons.

Yet he has continued to criticize the government of President Raul Castro for repression of basic civil and human rights, and his senior aides have offered little praise for a series of economic and social reforms the Cuban leader has instituted in recent years.

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