TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Canadians race to keep oil from derailment out of river

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

From Wire Reports
Monday, July 8, 2013, 9:21 p.m.
 

LAC-MEGANTIC, Quebec — The death toll in the devastating oil train derailment in Quebec reached 13 on Monday with 40 remaining unaccounted for as crews worked to contain 27,000 gallons of light crude that spilled from the tankers and made its way into nearby waterways.

There were fears it could flow into the St. Lawrence River all the way to Quebec City.

Investigators are testing ground and drinking water when crude oil from the railcars spilled into Chaudiere River that runs through the town.

Quebec's Environment Ministry spokesman Eric Cardinal said officials remained hopeful they could contain more than 85 percent of the spill.

All but one of the train's 73 tanker cars were carrying oil when they came loose early Saturday, sped downhill nearly seven miles into the town of Lac-Megantic, near the Maine border, and derailed, with at least five of the cars exploding.

The air brakes on the driverless train had been disabled by firefighters who were called to extinguish a blaze aboard one of the locomotives 90 minutes before the disaster, the head of the railway said.

The blasts decimated the town core, including a public library and a popular bar that was filled with revelers.

Quebec provincial police Sgt. Benoit Richard said eight more bodies had been found in the wreckage, after conditions improved enough for inspectors to get better access to the charred site. Police would not say where the bodies were located for fear of upsetting families.

Raymond Lafontaine, who believed he lost three members of his family, including his son, said he was angry with what appeared to be lack of safety regulations. “We always wait until there's a big accident to change things,” he said.

“Well, today we've had a big accident, it's one of the biggest ever in Canada.”

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. Obama celebrates gains, notes stalemates on visit to East Africa
  2. Turks, Kurdish rebels deepen hostility
  3. NATO proclaims ‘strong solidarity’ with Turkey against IS
  4. French students unearth 560,000-year-old tooth, oldest body part found in country
  5. U.S., Turkey plan for ‘safe zone’ free of ISIS in northern Syria
  6. Scientists warn about killer robots