TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

U.S. posts in Muslim world reopen despite murky threats

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By McClatchy Newspapers
Sunday, Aug. 11, 2013, 8:36 p.m.
 

CAIRO — Eighteen of the 19 U.S. embassies and consulates reopened on Sunday after being shut down for a week across the Islamic world because of a terrorist threat.

Even as the diplomatic posts inched toward normal operations, and as Muslims celebrated the end of the holy month of Ramadan, questions lingered about how pressing the danger had been and whether the threat had yet passed.

The U.S. Embassy in Sanaa, Yemen, the same nation from which a threat from al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula this month spurred the State Department to close its facilities, remained closed.

And the U.S. Consulate in Lahore, Pakistan, initially among the consulates open after U.S. officials announced that an unusually high number would be closed, remained shuttered indefinitely. U.S. officials evacuated personnel there on Friday on receiving “specific threats.”

The nature of those threats or who they aimed at remains unclear. A worldwide travel warning to Americans overseas remains in place through the end of August.

Meantime, the decision last week to close the embassies and consulates dashed previous assertions by the Obama administration that the al-Qaida threat was waning.

Indeed, the closures, coupled with a dearth of details about the threat, left many across the region wondering about the status of al-Qaida and whether it is staging a comeback.

The United States has not closed a comparable number of embassies and consulates since the months following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks.

In Yemen, some government officials are dubious about the threat posed to U.S. facilities. A Yemeni official claimed last week that the country had thwarted an al-Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula plot to take over cities and oil and gas installations in the eastern province of Hadramawt.

A high-ranking Yemeni security official told McClatchy that the claims of a foiled plot had no basis in fact.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. Debris on French island possibly that of missing Malaysia Airlines flight
  2. Scientists warn about killer robots
  3. Afghan intelligence: Taliban leader Mullah Omar dead 2 years
  4. U.N. projects world’s population to reach 9.7 billion by 2050, 11.2 billion by end of century
  5. Buildings in West Bank settlement torn down by order of Israel’s Supreme Court
  6. 2013 death of Taliban leader Mullah Omar confirmed
  7. Famine nears in Yemen; deadly blasts continue
  8. Nigerian leader: U.S. law based on alleged human rights violations ‘aids’ Boko Haram
  9. Defense secretary touts success of Kurdish fighters in war on ISIS
  10. Turkey to stick with air offensive in ISIS battle
  11. Libyans on death sentences for Gadhafi’s son, others: ‘Who cares?’