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U.S. wants Mexico to bring new charge against drug lord

| Sunday, Aug. 11, 2013, 9:00 p.m.
AFP/Getty Images
(FILES) File picture of former top Mexican drug cartel boss, Rafael Caro Quintero, under custody at the 'Puente Grande' prison in Guadalajara on January 29, 2005. Caro Quintero, who masterminded the kidnap and murder of a US anti-drug agent, has been ordered released in Mexico on August 9, 2013. A criminal court in the western state of Jalisco ordered Rafael Caro Quintero's release on August 7, 2013, a court official told AFP. Caro Quintero had served 28 years in prison for the 1985 murder of US Drug Enforcement Administration special agent Enrique Camarena, who was kidnapped in Guadalajara and tortured and murdered. As of June, Caro Quintero was still wanted in California on charges related to the murder and to drug trafficking. AFP PHOTO/PFPHO/AFP/Getty Images

MEXICO CITY — The Obama administration said Sunday that it's working with Mexico to bring new charges against a drug lord who persuaded a court to overturn his 40-year sentence in the kidnap, torture and murder of a U.S. anti-drug agent.

The chairman of the House Committee on Homeland Security said Rafael Caro Quintero's release on Friday was a test of Mexico's new president, who must see that Caro Quintero is put back behind bars.

National Security Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden said the United States is deeply concerned by Caro Quintero's release and that the United States is working with Mexican authorities to make that those responsible for the 1985 murder of Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena face justice in the U.S.

Justice Department spokesman Brian Fallon said Attorney General Eric Holder is in touch with Mexican authorities to convey U.S. concerns about Caro Quintero's release. The Mexican Attorney General's Office declined comment.

Rep. Michael McCaul, a Republican from Texas, said the appeals court's decision to overturn Caro Quintero's sentence was “insulting.”

McCaul said that Caro Quintero is “a cold-blooded killer and he's done 28 years.” He added that “it's not a good sign for the new administration right now.” McCaul predicted a “negative impact” on U.S.-Mexico relations “if the Mexican attorney general doesn't pursue additional federal charges or help with extradition.”

The three-judge court ruled that Caro Quintero should have been prosecuted in state not federal court, and overturned his sentence. He left prison Friday and has not been heard from since.

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