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Brotherhood protests draw fewer into streets of Egypt

| Friday, Aug. 30, 2013, 6:03 p.m.

CAIRO — Tens of thousands of protesters and Muslim Brotherhood supporters rallied Friday throughout Egypt against a military coup and a bloody security crackdown, though tanks and armored police vehicles barred them from converging in major squares.

The protests appeared smaller than the mass demonstrations seen in previous weeks, despite a push by the Brotherhood for “decisive” rallies across the country after Friday prayers.

The largest protest in the capital, Cairo, had more than 10,000 protesters. Thousands gathered in other cities, with other smaller protests drawing hundreds, including many women and children.

Protesters marched through the streets chanting slogans against the country's army chief, Gen. Abdel-Fatah el-Sissi, who led the popularly backed July 3 coup that toppled President Mohamed Morsy, a longtime leader of the Brotherhood.

“The people want the death of the assassin!” the protesters yelled while waving the Egyptian flag and holding up yellow posters with the outline of a hand showing four fingers. Morsy supporters have used the symbol in online and street campaigns to remember the sit-in protest around the Rabaah al-Adawiya mosque, which in Arabic means fourth.

Security forces cleared out that sit-in and another one two weeks ago in violent raids that sparked several days of violence. More than 1,000 people, most of them people opposed to Morsy's ouster, have been killed since. The Interior Ministry says more than 100 policemen and soldiers have been killed in the violence.

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