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Brazil calls out U.S. for allegedly spying on president

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By The Associated Press
Monday, Sept. 2, 2013, 8:09 p.m.

RIO DE JANEIRO — The Brazilian government condemned a U.S. spy program that reportedly targeted the nation's leader, labeled it an “unacceptable invasion” of sovereignty and called on Monday for international regulations to protect citizens and governments alike from cyber espionage.

In a sign that fallout over the spy program is spreading, the newspaper Folha de S.Paulo reported that President Dilma Rousseff might cancel her October trip to the United States, where she is to be honored with a state dinner. Folha cited unidentified Rousseff aides.

The Foreign Ministry called in U.S. Ambassador Thomas Shannon and told him that Brazil expects a prompt written explanation of the espionage allegations.

A report aired on Sunday on Globo TV citing documents from NSA leaker Edward Snowden that indicated the Uniteds States intercepted Rousseff's emails and phone calls, along with those of Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, whose communications were being monitored even before he was elected as president in July 2012.

Mexico's government said it had expressed its concerns to the ambassador and directly to the Obama administration.

Justice Minister Eduardo Cardozo said at a news conference that “from our point of view, this represents an unacceptable violation of Brazilian sovereignty.”

“This type of practice is incompatible with the confidence necessary for a strategic partnership between two nations,” Cardozo said.

Ricardo Ferraco, head of the Brazilian Senate's foreign relations committee, said lawmakers would investigate the espionage program's focus on Brazil.

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