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Leaks imperil U.S.-Brazil relationship

REUTERS
The correspondence of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff was the subject of American espionage, according to data leaked by former NSA worker Edward Snowden.

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By McClatchy Newspapers

Published: Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2013, 9:15 p.m.

MEXICO CITY — Revelations of a U.S. spy program that allegedly allows digital surveillance of the presidents of Brazil and Mexico have drawn cries of indignation and anger in both nations, but the fallout may be strongest for U.S.-Brazil relations.

At stake is whether Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff will cancel a planned state visit to Washington in October, the first offered by President Obama this year or will take action on digital security that may affect U.S. companies such as Google, Facebook and Yahoo.

Brazil's O Globo television network reported on Sunday night that the National Security Agency had spied on the emails, telephone calls and text messages of Rousseff and President Enrique Pena Nieto of Mexico. The report was based on documents obtained by journalist Glenn Greenwald, who lives in Rio de Janeiro, from Edward Snowden, a fugitive former NSA contractor who's living in Moscow.

O Globo's “Fantastico” program displayed an NSA document dated June 2012 that contained email sent by Pena Nieto, who was a presidential candidate at the time, discussing whom he might name to his cabinet once elected. The network displayed a separate document that revealed communication patterns between Rousseff and her top advisers.

The revelations drew expressions of indignation in Brazil and Mexico.

Rousseff held an emergency cabinet meeting on Monday, and her foreign minister, Luiz Alberto Figueiredo, summoned U.S. Ambassador Thomas Shannon for the second time since early July.

At a joint news conference on Monday in Brasilia with Minister of Justice Jose Eduardo Cardozo, Figueiredo called the actions “an inadmissible and unacceptable violation of Brazilian sovereignty” and said Brazil expected a written explanation from the White House by the end of the week.

For its part, Mexico's Foreign Secretariat said it “rejects and categorically condemns any act of espionage against Mexican citizens in violation of international law.” Mexico also summoned the U.S. ambassador, Anthony Wayne, but no meeting has yet taken place, as Wayne was out of the country.

Outrage seemed deeper and more widespread in Brazil than in Mexico.

One former Mexican ambassador, Andres Rozental, said he expected little fallout: “I don't think this is a major event for Mexico and Mexico-U.S. relations.”

 

 
 


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