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Acapulco tourists stranded; death toll from storms at 47

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By The Associated Press
Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013, 9:42 p.m.
 

ACAPULCO, Mexico — The death toll on Tuesday from the unusual one-two punch of a tropical storm and a hurricane hitting Mexico at nearly the same time rose to 47. Authorities scrambled to get help into, and stranded tourists out of, the resort city of Acapulco.

With roads blocked by landslides, rockslides, floods and collapsed bridges, Acapulco was cut off from road transport when Tropical Storm Manuel made landfall on Sunday. The terminal at the city's international airport was flooded, but not the landing strips.

Emergency flights began arriving in Acapulco to evacuate at least 40,000 mainly Mexican tourists stranded in the resort city where some streets were transformed into raging brown rivers.

Interior Secretary Miguel Angel Osorio Chong told Radio Formula that 27 people had died because of the storm in the Pacific coast state of Guerrero, where Acapulco is located. Osorio Chong said 20 more people died nationwide, many as a result of former hurricane Ingrid, which struck the Gulf coast on Monday. Mexican meteorologists said it was the first time since 1958 that two tropical storms or hurricanes had hit the country's coasts within 24 hours.

While most Acapulco hotels appeared to be operating normally, many outlying neighborhoods were without water or electricity, and floodwaters were knee-deep at the city airport's check-in counters.

Federal officials said it could take at least another two days to open the main highway to Acapulco, which was hit by more than 13 landslides from surrounding hills, and to bring food and relief supplies into the city of more than 800,000 people.

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