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Putin may seek 4th presidential term

| Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013, 9:24 p.m.

VALDAI, Russia — President Vladimir Putin said on Thursday he may run for a fourth presidential term in 2018, confirming the expectations of most Russians and frustrating those working to restore free elections in Russia.

If Putin runs and wins, it would keep him in power for about a quarter-century and make him the nation's longest-serving leader since Soviet dictator Josef Stalin.

Putin has largely rolled back Russia's post-Soviet democratic achievements, sidelining the opposition, reducing the Parliament to a rubber stamp and establishing tight control over the media.

He insisted that Russia, only two decades away from the fall of the Soviet Union, is determined to become a democracy and would find its own path despite criticism from the West.

“The kind of government that Russia should have should be determined by Russian citizens and not by our esteemed colleagues from abroad,” he said during an international conference, an annual event attended by Russia experts from the United States and Europe.

Putin, who served two consecutive four-year terms beginning in 2000, became prime minister in 2008 to observe a constitutional limit of two consecutive terms. He remained in charge as prime minister, with his loyal associate, Dmitry Medvedev, serving as a placeholder.

Medvedev initiated a law that extended the presidential term to six years, and Putin won a third term in 2012 despite major public protests in Moscow against his rule.

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