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Double bombing at Sunni funeral kills 14

| Monday, Sept. 23, 2013, 9:00 p.m.

BAGHDAD — A double bombing targeting Sunni mourners in Baghdad killed 14 people on Monday, the third consecutive day in which funerals have been attacked across Iraq, officials said.

Police say back-to-back blasts tore through a tent that had been set up for the funeral of one of four people killed two days before when gunmen attacked a store selling liquor in the Sunni neighborhood of Azamiyah. A security official said 35 were wounded in the bombing.

The funeral attack occurred a day after a suicide bombing at a Sunni funeral in Baghdad that left 16 dead. On Saturday, a double suicide attack on a Shiite funeral killed 72 mourners.

Attacks on Shiite civilian targets — including funerals — are a hallmark of al-Qaida's Iraq branch. But it was not clear whether the two attacks on Sunnis were the work of al-Qaida, which has been known to target Sunni rivals, or part of a growing number of apparent reprisal attacks by Shiites. The Azamiyah shooting was believed to be carried out by hard-line Sunni militants, who are most likely to attack liquor stores in Sunni areas.

More than 4,000 people were killed between April and August, a level of carnage not seen in years. The re-emergence of tit-for-tat retaliatory killings has raised fears that Iraq might be returning to that cycle of violence.

Earlier in the day, police said gunmen broke into the home of a Shiite family in the Sunni-dominated own of Youssifiyah, south of Baghdad, and killed three members of a family.

Two police officers say the parents and their 16-year-old son died in the attack.

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