TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Lebanese army subs for Hezbollah at Beirut checkpoints

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By McClatchy Newspapers
Monday, Sept. 23, 2013, 9:48 p.m.
 

BEIRUT — Lebanese security forces replaced Hezbollah fighters on Monday at checkpoints in Beirut's southern suburbs in response to criticism that the group's recently enacted security measures proved it maintains its own mini-state in southern Lebanon.

Hezbollah set up dozens of checkpoints this summer to control access to an area known as Dahiya after a series of bombings and other incidents targeted the militant group's followers in apparent retaliation for its open support for the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad.

The checkpoints, however, served as a daily reminder that Shiite Muslim Hezbollah, which maintains tens of thousands of well-trained fighters, is Lebanon's most powerful political and military force, and they sparked repeated complaints from Sunni Muslim and Christian politicians that Hez-bollah once again had bypassed the Lebanese state.

Lebanon's caretaker interior minister, Marwan Charbel, urged residents to assist with the transition.

“The residents should support the security forces, and they should not doubt their competency and capabilities,” he said. “I urge the residents of Dahiya to cooperate with the security forces, who are deployed to ensure their safety.”

He shouldered the blame for Hezbollah's having to assign its own fighters to protect the neighborhood after a suicide blast last month killed dozens of people just a hundred yards from key Hezbollah facilities.

“The problem in Dahiya and the phenomenon of autonomous security emerged because of our shortcomings,” he said.

One resident said she viewed the development with a mixture of relief and concern, noting the army's reputation for being more low-key than the Hezbollah fighters.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. Gunbattle kills 21 at Afghan wedding party
  2. U.S., Turkey plan for ‘safe zone’ free of ISIS in northern Syria
  3. Chinese woman crushed to death in escalator
  4. Saudis’ deadly airstrikes resume in Yemen
  5. Obama knocks Huckabee, Trump for slide in Republican rhetoric
  6. Saudi-led airstrikes kill 120 in Yemen
  7. Syria’s embattled President Assad admits manpower shortage
  8. Turkey denies it tolerates terror
  9. Greek leaders OK new reforms
  10. Israelis remember how summer conflict affected beach ritual
  11. Defense secretary touts success of Kurdish fighters in war on ISIS