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Retired pope says he never hid abuse

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By The Associated Press

Published: Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2013, 7:48 p.m.

VATICAN CITY — Seven months after leaving the papacy, emeritus Pope Benedict XVI broke his self-imposed silence on Tuesday by releasing a letter to one of Italy's best-known atheists in which he denied covering up for sexually abusive priests and defended Christianity to nonbelievers.

It was the first work published by Benedict since he retired and his first denial of personal responsibility for the sex scandal. But what made the letter published in La Repubblica more remarkable was that it appeared just two weeks after Pope Francis penned a similar letter to the newspaper's atheist editor.

The Vatican spokesman, the Rev. Federico Lombardi, said the appearance of the letters was pure coincidence. But they provide evidence that the two men in white, who live across the Vatican gardens from one another, are of the same mind about the need for such dialogue and may even be collaborating on it.

Benedict wrote his letter to Piergiorgio Odifreddi, an Italian atheist and mathematician who in 2011 wrote a book titled “Dear Pope, I'm Writing to You.” The book was Odifreddi's reaction to Benedict's classic “Introduction to Christianity,” perhaps his best-known work.

In his book, Odifreddi posed a series of polemical arguments about the Catholic faith, including the church's sex abuse scandal.

For nearly a quarter-century, the former Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger headed the Vatican's Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, the Vatican office responsible for handling abuse cases. He was prefect when the scandal exploded in the United States in 2002 and was pope when it erupted on a global scale in 2010 with revelations of thousands of victims in Europe and beyond, of bishops who covered up for pedophile priests and of Vatican officials who turned a blind eye to the crimes and in some cases actively interfered with bishops trying to report pedophiles to police.

In his letter, Benedict denies personal responsibility. “I never tried to cover these things up,” he wrote.

“That the power of evil penetrated so far into the interior world of the faith is a suffering that we must bear, but at the same time, we must do everything to prevent it from repeating,” he wrote.

As prefect, Ratzinger in 2001 compelled bishops around the world to send credible cases of abuse to his office for review. He took the move because it had become clear to him that bishops were merely shuffling abusive priests around, rather than subjecting them to church trials.

Ratzinger tried in 1988 to get around the cumbersome church trials, asking the Vatican's legal office for quicker ways to permanently remove priests who raped and molested children. But he was rebuffed, with the legal office saying that doing so would compromise the priests' ability to defend themselves.

Ratzinger was hamstrung by Pope John Paul II's unspoken policy against letting young men leave the priesthood and his overriding concern with preserving the rights of accused clerics, often at the expense of victims. It was a concern formed in part by his experiences in communist-controlled Poland, where priests were often accused of trumped-up charges.

Eventually, a year after the abuse scandal exploded in the United States, Ratzinger pushed through administrative changes in 2003 and 2004 that enabled his office to permanently remove abusers without going through a church trial. But that decision came decades after his office began receiving a steady stream of documentation about the scale of abuse in the United States — far too late, according to victims.

 

 
 


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