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Some in Iran have no use for improved ties with U.S.

| Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013, 5:18 p.m.
AFP/Getty Images
TOPSHOTS-Iranian president Hassan Rouhani is surrounded by bodyguards after a shoe was thrown towards his car as his motorcade leaves Tehran's Mehrabad Airport upon his arrival from New York, on September 28, 2013. A shoe was thrown towards Rouhani's car as he arrived home to a mixed reception for his historic call with Barack Obama, an AFP correspondent reported. AFP PHOTO/ATTA KENAREATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images

TEHRAN, Iran — Smiling and waving flags, Iranians from across the political spectrum welcomed President Hassan Rouhani home on Saturday with cheers for his historic phone conversation with his American counterpart. But anger over the contact between the enemy nations signaled challenges ahead.

Hard-liners opposed to any improved contact with Washington made their objections clear as several dozen protesters chanting “Death to America” tried to block his motorcade in Tehran. The semiofficial Mehr news agency reported that at least one demonstrator hurled a shoe — a common gesture of contempt in the Middle East — in Rouhani's direction. According to other reports, eggs were thrown at his car.

“Dialogue with Satan is not ‘hope and prudence,'” some chanted, using the Rouhani's campaign from the June presidential election.

Rouhani supporters, meanwhile, greeted him with placards thanking him for seeking peace instead of confrontation. One banner read: “Yes to peace, no to war.”

The 15-minute phone call between and President Obama on Friday capped a week of drama revolving around Rouhani's participation in the annual U.N. meeting of world leaders.

The Iranian leader now has the difficult mission of trying to unite the country behind his outreach to ease a three-decade-long estrangement with the United States and move toward a possible settlement to roll back sanctions imposed over Tehran's nuclear program. The West says Iran's program aims at developing weapons technology, while Tehran says it is for peaceful purposes.

The effort appears to have the critical backing of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei. But even the endorsement from Iran's most powerful figure is not enough to silence criticism of the fast-paced developments.

Alaeddin Boroujerdi, who heads the foreign policy and national security committee in parliament, was quoted by Iranian media as saying that the call showed Iran's “might.” But a hard-line news website said there was no justification for Rouhani to talk to the “Great Satan,” and that the conversation was “a strange and useless step.”

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