TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Iran will negotiate, if sanctions dropped, says foreign minister

Holocaust myth? ‘Bad translation,' Zarif says

The phrase “the myth of the massacre of Jews” appears in a translation of a 2006 speech by Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamanei.

“The Holocaust is not a myth,” Foreign Minister Javad Zarif said on Sunday when asked about the quote. “If it's there … it's a bad translation,” Zarif said. “We condemn the killing of innocent people, whether it happened in Nazi Germany or whether it's happening in Palestine.”

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Los Angeles Times
Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013, 7:06 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Iran's foreign minister said on Sunday that his country was willing to negotiate with the United States over its nuclear program but that Washington needed to reciprocate by stopping the sanctions that have crippled Iran's economy.

Taking a tone that was conciliatory at times but mainly tough, Mohammad Javad Zarif said on ABC's “This Week” that the United States and Iran had taken the “first step in removing the tensions, doubts and misgivings that the two sides have had about each other for the last 30-some years.”

Zarif met with the secretary of State last week in New York, and President Obama spoke by phone with Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, the nations' first direct contact at that level since the 1979 Islamic revolution.

Zarif insisted that Tehran never had military intentions with its uranium enrichment.

“Iran is prepared to start negotiating” on the issue, he said, adding that the United States also must do certain things, including halting what he contended were “illegal sanctions against Iran that are targeting ordinary Iranians.”

Iran has been hit with sanctions from the U.N. Security Council and measures aimed at its oil and banking sectors imposed by the United States and the European Union.

“We believe that if the United States is ready to recognize Iran's rights, to respect Iran's rights and move from that perspective, then we have a real chance, and we negotiate with the full authority of the leader,” Zarif said, referring to Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamanei.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. Boko Haram beheading video mimics Islamic State propaganda
  2. Teacher charged with drug smuggling in Japan
  3. Rice says U.S. has Israel’s back, won’t accept nuclear-armed Iran
  4. Iran’s role against ISIS in Tikrit stokes U.S. unease over Tehran influence, Sunni-Shiite tensions
  5. Netanyahu claims moral obligation to speak
  6. Fugitive on U.S. most-wanted terror list held by Somalia
  7. Pakistani parents jailed for refusing to vaccinate children against polio
  8. Russia promises full probe of killing of Putin rival
  9. Venezuela calls for U.S. to slash diplomatic mission by 80 percent
  10. American politicians hail travel ban by Venezuela’s socialist President Maduro
  11. 9 dead including gunman in Czech restaurant shooting