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Terrorist wanted by U.S. nabbed in Libya

| Saturday, Oct. 5, 2013, 9:06 p.m.
Getty Images
FILE - OCTOBER 5: U.S. forces announced that they captured Nazih Abdul-Hamed al-Ruqai, known as Abu Anas al-Liby, who was indicted in 2000 in the 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania October 5, 2013 in Tripoli, Libya. UNSPECIFIED - UNDATED: Anas Al-Liby, a suspected terrorist, is shown in this photo released by the FBI October 10, 2001 in Washington, D.C. Al-Liby is wanted in connection with the bombings of the U.S. Embassies August 7, 1998 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Nairobi, Kenya. (Photo Courtesy of FBI/Getty Images)

TRIPOLI, Libya — U.S. forces seized an al-Qaida leader connected to the 1998 embassy bombings in eastern Africa and wanted by the U.S. for more than a decade outside his house on Saturday in the Libyan capital, his relatives said.

His capture, if confirmed, would be the latest blow to al-Qaida, which has seen its leadership consistently targeted since the death of Osama bin Laden.

Nazih Abdul-Hamed al-Ruqai, known by his alias Anas al-Libi, is believed to have returned to Libya during the 2011 civil war that led to the ouster and killing of dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

His brother, Nabih, said the 49-year-old was parking outside his house early Saturday after dawn prayers, when three vehicles encircled him, smashed the car's window and seized his gun before grabbing him and fleeing. The brother said el-Libi's wife saw the kidnapping from her window and described the abductors as foreign-looking armed “commandos.”

Al-Libi is on the FBI's most-wanted list with a $ 5 million bounty on his head. He was indicted in the Southern District of New York for his alleged involvement in the bombings of the United States Embassies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Nairobi, Kenya, on August 7, 1998.

Libyan officials didn't return calls, and the United States issued no statements.

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