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Pakistan's powerful army chief announces plans to retire

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By The Washington Post
Sunday, Oct. 6, 2013, 9:57 p.m.
 

ISLAMABAD — The powerful head of Pakistan's army said on Sunday he will retire at the end of November, clearing the way for Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif to select a replacement while maintaining the balance of power between civilian and military leadership.

With his term already extended once in 2010, Gen. Ashfaq Kayani had been widely expected for months to give up control of the country's nuclear-armed forces after six years on the job. But there had been mounting speculation that Sharif, who began his third term in June, could keep Kayani in a senior military position amid growing uncertainty about the region's future.

Pakistan is facing relentless terrorist attacks from Islamist militants, continued tension on its eastern border with India and uncertainty over the long-term stability of neighboring Afghanistan as U.S. forces prepare to withdraw next year.

Appointed in 2007 by military ruler Pervez Musharraf, Kayani is widely viewed as a deft leader, popular in Pakistan as well as in world capitals, including Washington.

In a statement, the 61-year-old general said he would step aside so that Pakistan can continue to progress toward a stable, functional democracy.

“As I complete my tenure, the will of the people has taken root and a constitutional order is in place,” Kayani said. “The armed forces of Pakistan fully support and want to strengthen this democratic order.”

Under military rule for much of its 66-year history, Pakistan has long struggled to strike a balance between its elected leaders and its military. There have been three successful military coups in Pakistan, including the one led by Musharraf in 1999 that resulted in Sharif being ousted from his second term and exiled to Saudi Arabia.

In May, Sharif was returned to power in a historic national election that marked the first transfer of power from one democratically elected government to another.

When Sharif was sworn in early June, many analysts feared an awkward, perhaps confrontational, relationship between him and the country's military.

Those fears have not yet materialized, as both Sharif and senior military leaders have worked to try to convey a unified, civilian command. Sharif, for example, has been given latitude to seek peace talks with the country's longtime adversary, India.

 

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