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Kerry appears to reject Iran's call for new nuclear program proposal

‘It's a credit to the Assad regime'

Syrian President Bashar Assad's government has so far complied with a chemical weapons deal, the secretary of State said on Monday.

John Kerry was speaking as international monitors began the destruction of Syria's stockpile.

“The process has begun in record time, and we are appreciative for the Russian cooperation and obviously for the Syrian compliance,” Kerry said after talks with his Russian counterpart at the summit in Bali, Indonesia.

“I think it's extremely significant that yesterday, Sunday, within a week of the (U.N.) resolution being passed, some chemical weapons were being destroyed. I think it's a credit to the Assad regime, frankly.” — BBC News

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By From Wire Reports
Monday, Oct. 7, 2013, 8:27 p.m.
 

BALI, Indonesia — Warming U.S.-Iranian relations do not mean that the United States will back off its demands about Iran's nuclear program, or roll back missile defenses in Europe aimed at intercepting an Iranian attack, Secretary of State John Kerry said on Monday.

Iran's foreign minister, who met with Kerry last month at the United Nations, was quoted in state media on Sunday as saying the United States should bring new proposals to a nuclear bargaining session next week. Kerry appeared to reject that, saying Iran still hasn't responded to the last offer put forth by the United States, Russia and others in February.

“We're waiting for the fullness of the Iranian difference in their approach now,” Kerry said, after a meeting here with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. “But we're encouraged by the statements that were made in New York.”

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani argued at the U.N. General Assembly last month that Iran's program is not dangerous and that his country will cooperate with monitors to prove that. Sanctions are counterproductive and should end, he argued.

On the sidelines of the U.N. meeting in New York, Kerry had an unusual meeting with Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif, and President Obama telephoned Rouhani for the first direct contact between leaders of the two nations since before the 1979 Iranian revolution and takeover of the U.S. Embassy.

Lavrov, who plans to attend next week's much-anticipated nuclear meeting in Switzerland, said the international group negotiating with Iran wants “a road map which would, at the end of the day, satisfy the international community that the Iranian nuclear program is entirely peaceful” and put under the full control of international nuclear monitors.

 

 
 


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