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Libya in hands of multiple militias

| Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, 7:00 p.m.
REUTERS
Libyan Prime Minister Ali Zeidan addresses a news conference at the Prime Minister’s Office in Tripoli on Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013 after his release from captivity at the hands of former rebel militiamen.

TRIPOLI, Libya — The abduction was brief but still audacious: Gunmen from one of Libya's many militias stormed a hotel where the prime minister has a residence and held him for several hours Thursday — apparently in retaliation for his government's alleged collusion with the United States in a raid last weekend that captured an al-Qaida suspect.

The brazen seizure of Prime Minister Ali Zidan heightened the alarm over the power of unruly militias that virtually hold the weak central government hostage. Many of the militias include Islamic militants and have ideologies similar to al-Qaida's. The armed bands regularly use violence to intimidate officials to sway policies, gunning down security officials and kidnapping their relatives.

At the same time, the state relies on militias to act as security forces, since the police and military remain in disarray after dictator Moammar Gadhafi was overthrown and killed in 2011. The militias are rooted in the brigades that fought in the uprising and are often referred to as “revolutionaries.”

Many militias are paid by the Defense or Interior ministries — which are in charge of the military and police respectively — although the ministries are still unable to control them.

Not only was Zidan abducted by militiamen who officially work in a state body, it took other militias to rescue him by storming the site where he was held in the capital.

“The abduction is like the shock that awakened Libyans. Facts on the ground now are clearer than never before: Libya is ruled by militias,” said prominent rights campaigner Hassan al-Amin.

Zidan's abduction was carried out before dawn,when about 150 gunmen in pickup trucks stormed the luxury Corinthia Hotel in downtown Tripoli, witnesses told The Associated Press. They swarmed into the lobby and some charged up to Zidan's residence on the 21st floor.

The gunmen scuffled with Zidan's guards before they seized him and led him out at around 5:15 a.m., said the witnesses, speaking on condition of anonymity because they feared for their own safety. They said Zidan offered no resistance.

In the afternoon, government spokesman Mohammed Kaabar told the LANA news agency that Zidan had been “set free.”

A militia commander affiliated with the Interior Ministry said his fighters, along with armed groups from two Tripoli districts, Souq Jomaa and Tajoura, stormed the house where Zidan was being held, exchanged fire with the captors, and rescued him.

The abduction was carried out by two state-affiliated militia groups, the Revolutionaries Operation Room and the Anti-Crime Department. They put out statements saying they had “arrested” Zidan on accusations of harming state security and corruption. The public prosecutor's office said it had issued no such warrant.

The motive for the abduction was not immediately known, but it came after many militias and Islamic militants expressed outrage over the U.S. Delta Force raid Saturday that seized al-Qaida suspect Nazih Abdul-Hamed al-Ruqai, known by his alias Abu Anas al-Libi, from the street outside his home in Tripoli.

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