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Snowden said to be doing well

AP
Lon Snowden, while in in Moscow on Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, said he had not had direct contact with Edward Snowden, but that he felt 'extreme gratitude that my son is safe and secure and he's free.'

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By The Associated Press
Thursday, Oct. 10, 2013, 7:15 p.m.
 

MOSCOW — Four former U.S. government officials who met with former National Security Agency systems analyst Edward Snowden said on Thursday that he is adjusting to life in Russia and expresses no regrets about leaking highly classified information. Separately, Snowden's father arrived to see his son.

The Americans, who once worked for the CIA, FBI, Justice Department and NSA, have criticized the government and exposed what they believed was wrongdoing in the security agencies. All supporters of Snowden, they are the first Americans known to have met with him since he was granted asylum in Russia in August.

In interviews with The Associated Press, they described spending the previous evening with Snowden to present him an award given annually by a group of retired national security officers.

“He spoke about going out and about and getting to understand Russia and its culture and the people,” said Thomas Drake, who started working for the NSA in 2001 and disclosed an electronic espionage program that he saw as invasive. “This is where he lives now, and so where you live is your home.”

Snowden's father, Lon, did not say when or where he would meet his 30-year-old son, but expressed optimism about his situation.

“You know, I have heard so many things through the media, and my assumption is certainly, given the circumstances, he's doing as well as could be expected,” Lon Snowden said.

The elder Snowden said he doubts his son will return to the United States, where he is charged with violating the Espionage Act for disclosing the NSA's surveillance of phone and Internet usage around the world.

The four Americans refused to say where they met with Snowden or where he is living.

“For his own safety, it's best that no one else knows where he actually lives,” Drake said. “But I believe he is making the best of his circumstances and is living as normally as possible.”

Like Snowden, Drake was indicted under the Espionage Act, but the felony charges were dropped before trial and he was found guilty in 2011 on a lesser charge and sentenced to one year of probation and community service.

Drake and the other Americans — Raymond McGovern, Jesselyn Radack and Coleen Rowley — said Snowden was in good spirits and still believes he did the right thing in disclosing the NSA surveillance program.

 

 
 


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