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Conservative Catholics question pope's approach

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By The Washington Post
Monday, Oct. 14, 2013, 9:06 p.m.
 

Rattled by Pope Francis' admonishment to Catholics not to be “obsessed” by doctrine, his stated reluctance to judge gay priests and his apparent willingness to engage just about anyone — including atheists — many conservative Catholics are doing what only recently seemed unthinkable: They are openly questioning the pope.

Concern among traditionalists began building soon after Francis was elected this spring. Almost immediately, the new pope told non-Catholic and atheist journalists he would bless them silently out of respect. Soon after, he eschewed Vatican practice and included women in a foot-washing ceremony.

The wary traditionalists became critical when, in an interview a few weeks ago, Francis said Catholics shouldn't be “obsessed” with imposing doctrines, including on gay marriage and abortion.

This month, Francis told an atheist journalist that people should follow good and fight evil as they “conceive” of them.

These remarks followed an interview with journalists this summer aboard the papal airplane in which the pope declared that it is not his role to judge someone who is gay “if they accept the Lord and have good will.”

Never mind that the pope has made clear his acceptance of church doctrine, which regards homosexuality and abortion as sins and bans women from the priesthood. Behind the growing skepticism is the fear in some quarters that Francis's all-embracing style and spontaneous speech, so open as it is to interpretation, are undoing decades of church efforts to speak clearly on Catholic teachings.

Some conservatives believe that the pope is undermining them at a time when they are being sidelined by an increasingly secular culture.

“When abortion rights group NARAL sends you a thank-you note, it's clear something got miscommunicated,” said Robert Royal, president of the think tank Faith & Reason.

Francis is “a remarkable man, no one would deny that,” Royal said. “But I'm not sure if he cares about being accurate. He gets into an (evangelizing) dynamic with people, and that seems to be the most important thing. ... In some ways, it makes people very anxious. If you do this, what's the next thing?”

During the previous three decades, Popes John Paul II and Benedict shared a focus: Make orthodox teachings crystal-clear so Catholics don't get lost in an increasingly messy, relativistic world.

Catholics also became accustomed to popes who were largely speaking to “the Church,” rather than the public. They often communicated in the language of Catholic theology, and through books, not through long, freewheeling interviews, as does Pope Francis.

“In the past, everything you heard from a pope was prepared or formally released. And that was intentional — not to say anything ad hoc. And it's also intentional that this one does,” said Phil Lawler, editor of Catholic World News, a conservative news agency. “I think his entire focus is outside the church. That's huge.”

 

 
 


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