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NSA hacked email of Mexico's president, leaked files reveal

| Sunday, Oct. 20, 2013, 8:36 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Der Spiegel reported on Sunday that the National Security Agency has been systematically eavesdropping on the Mexican government for years. The U.S. agency hacked into the president's public email account and gained deep insight into policymaking and the political system, the German newspaper said, citing documents leaked by former U.S. contractor Edward Snowden.

Mexico's government condemned the alleged hacking of the email account of then-President Felipe Calderon in 2010.

“In a relationship between neighbors and partners, there's no room for the practices that allegedly took place,” the foreign ministry said, reiterating its call for President Obama's administration to conduct an investigation of NSA conduct.

In an operation called “Flatliquid,” the NSA used a server to gain access to Calderon's account and the Mexican presidential domain used by cabinet members for diplomatic and economic communications.

The United States gathers foreign intelligence of the type gathered by all nations, the NSA said in a statement, declining to comment on the Der Spiegel report.

In another, previously unknown operation reported by the German paper, the agency gained access in 2009 to emails of high-ranking officials in Mexico's bureau that combats drug and human trafficking.

This hacking operation let the NSA not only obtain information on several drug cartels, but also gain access to “diplomatic talking-points.” In a single year, this operation produced 260 classified reports that allowed Americans to conduct successful talks on political issues and plan investments.

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