Syrian army prepares border attack against rebels

| Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, 7:57 p.m.

ARSAL, Lebanon — Syrian rebels and their Lebanese allies in command of a crucial corridor that links rebel havens in Lebanon with Damascus are anticipating a regime attack aimed at bringing the area back under loyalist control.

Rebels and activists in the Lebanese border town of Arsal will attempt to cut off sympathetic areas in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley from rebel-controlled villages just across the border in Syria.

The enclave that has sprung up on both sides of the border near the Jebel Qalamoun mountain peak represents the largest rebel haven near Damascus, the ultimate goal of the insurgents. Its population is swollen by Syrian refugees and fighters who fled the government offensive this year that retook the cities of Qusayr and Homs. Now tens of thousands of rebel fighters are preparing to make a final stand to keep Arsal from being cut off from the Syrian battlefield.

“We will fight to the last man,” said Abu Omar Hujieri, a Lebanese activist and fighter. With Qusayr and Homs essentially back under the control of Syrian President Bashar Assad, a government success in seizing the Jebel Qalamoun region would finish the rebel presence here.

Almost from the beginning of the anti-Assad uprising 30 months ago, Arsal has been a crucial logistics hub and haven for Syrian rebels, who found the mostly Sunni Muslim population, with its strong family and political ties to Syrian Muslims, ready to openly assist.

“This is our war just like theirs,” Abu Omar explained of the Lebanese involvement. “They are our family, our neighbors and our friends. All the people of Arsal are with the rebellion.”

With about 30,000 refugees joining the 40,000 people who lived here, the communities appear to be acting as one even as the rest of Lebanon struggles to absorb, politically and economically, more than a million refugees from both sides of the conflict. Signs of rebel sympathy abound, and the town has made housing available to tens of thousands in Arsal and the surrounding villages.

The situation is alarming to Hezbollah, the Shiite Muslim group that's Lebanon's most powerful political organization and a staunch ally of Assad's. Hezbollah officials say the tens of thousands of rebel fighters in Arsal and on the Syrian side of the border nearby leave Lebanon vulnerable to terrorist attacks.

Hezbollah is expected to commit scores of its fighting units to the battle, and it's been conducting reconnaissance missions on both sides of the border for an offensive, an undertaking that's complicated by the area's rugged mountains.

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