TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

France summons U.S. ambassador over spying claims

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.
AP
U.S Ambassador to France Charles H. Rivkin, right, leaves the Foreign Ministry in Paris, after he was summoned Monday, Oct. 21, 2013. The French government had summoned the ambassador to explain why the Americans spied on one of their closest allies. Le Monde newspaper said Monday, Oct. 21, 2013 that documents leaked by Edward Snowden show that the U.S. National Security Agency swept up 70.3 million French phone records in a 30-day period. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

Daily Photo Galleries

By The Associated Press
Monday, Oct. 21, 2013, 7:21 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Joining a growing list of angry allies, France on Monday sought an explanation from Washington on a report that the United States swept up 70 million French telephone records and text messages in its global surveillance net, even recording certain private conversations.

The fallout prompted a phone call from President Obama to President Francois Hollande and, the White House said, an acknowledgment by Obama that the episode raises “legitimate questions for our friends and allies” about how U.S. surveillance capabilities are employed. Hollande's office issued a strongly worded statement afterward expressing “profound reprobation” over U.S. actions that it said intruded on the private lives of French citizens.

Spying among friendly countries is classic tradecraft, but the sweep and scope of the National Security Agency program have surprised allies and raised indignation among those targeted — Germany, Mexico and Brazil among them.

The report in Le Monde, co-written by Glenn Greenwald, who originally revealed the surveillance program based on leaks from former NSA analyst Edward Snowden, found that when certain phone numbers were used, conversations were automatically recorded. The surveillance operation gathered text messages based on key words, Le Monde reported.

“This sort of practice between partners that invades privacy is totally unacceptable, and we have to make sure, very quickly, that this no longer happens,” French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said. “We fully agree that we cooperate to fight terrorism. It is indispensable. But this does not justify that personal data of millions of our compatriots are snooped on.”

Seeking to limit damage in relations with one of America's closest allies, Obama called Hollande late Monday and made clear the U.S. government is reviewing its intelligence-gathering “so that we properly balance the legitimate security concerns of our citizens and allies with the privacy concerns that all people share,” a White House statement said. The statement said some recent disclosures have “distorted our activities” while others have raised genuine concerns by other countries.

Earlier, the French government summoned U.S. Ambassador Charles Rivkin for answers. A statement issued by the U.S. Embassy in Paris said Rivkin assured Alexandre Ziegler, chief of staff to Fabius, that “our ongoing bilateral consultations on allegations of information-gathering by U.S. government agencies would continue.”

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. Help slow to reach Nepal villages damaged by earthquake
  2. Japan steps up defense activities amid worries about China, North Korea
  3. Nepal quake death toll tops 4,000 as villages plead for aid
  4. Ex-Gitmo detainees protest in Uruguay
  5. Employees of Mercer County-based manufacturer among missing in Nepal
  6. Poland blocks pro-Putin Russian bikers at border
  7. Military draftees ignore Ukraine’s call to arms
  8. U.S.-backed rebels seize town, cut off land supply route to Assad forces in Syria
  9. Aftershocks terrify survivors of quake in Nepal that killed 2,500
  10. Senior officials are toppled in China’s anti-graft campaign
  11. Mexicans pin hopes on anti-corruption measures approved by Congress