TribLIVE

| USWorld

 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Drone use a war crime, human rights groups claim

Email Newsletters

Click here to sign up for one of our email newsletters.

Daily Photo Galleries

By Reuters
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013, 8:09 p.m.
 

WASHINGTON — Human rights groups on Tuesday accused the United States of breaking international law and perhaps committing war crimes by killing civilians in missile and drone strikes that were intended to hit militants in Pakistan and Yemen.

Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch released separate reports detailing the deaths of dozens of civilians in the two countries. They urged the Obama administration and Congress to investigate, and end a policy of secrecy on the attacks.

“In some of the cases we looked at ... they appear to be war crimes, but really the full picture is for the U.S. authorities to reveal,” Mustafa Qadri, Pakistan researcher at Amnesty International, said when describing the death of a 68-year-old Pakistani grandmother in an alleged drone strike.

“We are saying for the U.S. authorities to come clean,” he said at a joint news conference with Human Rights Watch.

Responding to the reports, White House spokesman Jay Carney said Obama administration officials “take the matter of civilian casualties enormously seriously.” He said he could not speak to specific operations, but that policies met international and domestic legal obligations, and the standard of “near certainty” that civilians would not be hit.

Officials have argued that any drone strikes are very carefully targeted and that civilian casualties have been kept to a bare minimum, possibly in the low dozens.

Letta Tayler of Human Rights Watch said her organization had found violations of international law when civilians were “indiscriminately” killed in Yemen.

In a Sept. 2, 2012, attack, the target — an alleged al Qaeda militant, Abd al-Raouf al-Dahab, — was “nowhere in sight” when the United States hit a passenger van and killed 12 people returning from the market, she said.

“Their loved ones found their charred bodies in pieces on the roadside, dusted in flour and sugar that they were bringing home to their families,” Tayler said.

Both the Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch reports looked at a handful of U.S. attacks in Pakistan and Yemen to urge transparency and accountability in policy.

U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan and Yemen increased dramatically after President Obama took office in 2009, and the pilotless aerial vehicles became a key part of the fight against al-Qaida. More recently, the number of strikes has slowed.

Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.

 

 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. ‘Super giant’ natural gas field found off Egypt in Mediterranean Sea
  2. Temple in ancient Syrian city of Palmyra bombed by ISIS terrorists
  3. British Columbia windstorm knocks out electricity
  4. Migrant crisis forces European Union leaders to set summit
  5. Egypt, sans parliament for more than 3 years, sets elections
  6. Malaysia Prime Minister Najib scorns thousands demanding his resignation
  7. Fire at Saudi oil company residence kills 11
  8. Migrants risk all to flee
  9. Migrant surge: Europe ill-prepared for invasion of foreigners
  10. Nazi ‘gold train’ evidence mounts
  11. Iran holds final hearing for U.S. journalist