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Mexico detains undocumented Cuban migrants

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'American Coyotes' Series

Traveling by Jeep, boat and foot, Tribune-Review investigative reporter Carl Prine and photojournalist Justin Merriman covered nearly 2,000 miles over two months along the border with Mexico to report on coyotes — the human traffickers who bring illegal immigrants into the United States. Most are Americans working for money and/or drugs. This series reports how their operations have a major impact on life for residents and the environment along the border — and beyond.

By McClatchy Newspapers
Friday, Oct. 25, 2013, 9:51 p.m.
 

MIAMI — The number of undocumented Cubans intercepted in Mexico on their way to the U.S. border has more than doubled in the eight months since Havana eased its migration controls, according to Mexican government figures.

The Interior Ministry numbers were the latest indication of the greatly increased flow of Cubans, undocumented and legal, through Mexico, Central and South America and the Caribbean over the past year.

Most, if not all of the Cubans, are heading to the United States, where they are protected from deportation to Cuba, can receive benefits as refugees and qualify for permanent U.S. residency after one year and one day.

Interdictions in Mexico of undocumented Cubans totaled 2,300 from January to August of this year, compared with 994 in the same period in 2012, according to the Interior Ministry.

The number does not include those who make it to the border undetected by Mexican authorities. That figure has been estimated at more than 13,000 for the 12-month period that ended Sept. 30.

Legal air arrivals to Mexico by Cubans with tourist or migrant visas also rose from 30,750 in the first eight months of 2012 to 33,017 in the same period this year, according to Mexican government figures.

Those figures represent an increase of 2,237 arrivals, or 7.2 percent, although Mexican officials noted the same person could have made several entries.

Santiago Alpizar, a Miami immigration lawyer, said many more Cubans have left the island in recent months because of Cuba's moribund economy and President Raul Castro's decision to ease migration controls on Jan. 14.

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