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Saudi women defy ban by driving

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By The Associated Press
Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, 9:03 p.m.

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — More than 60 women across Saudi Arabia claimed they drove cars on Saturday in defiance of a ban keeping them from getting behind the wheel, drawing little protest by police in their push for easing restrictions on women in the kingdom.

The campaign's message is that driving should be a woman's choice. The struggle is rooted in the kingdom's hard-line interpretation of Islam known as Wahabbism, with critics warning that women driving could unravel the very fabric of Saudi society.

Though no laws ban women from driving in Saudi Arabia, authorities do not issue them licenses. Women who drove on Saturday had driver's licenses from abroad, activists said.

Activist Aziza Youssef, a professor at King Saud University, and another activist said protest organizers received 13 videos and about 50 phone messages from women showing or claiming they had driven. She said they have no way to verify the messages.

May Al Sawyan, a 32-year-old mother of two and an economic researcher, said she drove from her home in Riyadh to the grocery store and back. Activists uploaded a four-minute video of her driving to the campaign's YouTube account.

Al Sawyan said she was prepared to be jailed if caught by authorities. She said she was far enough from a police car that she was not spotted.

“I just took a small loop,” she said. “I didn't drive for a long way, but it was fine.”

It is not clear whether police turned a blind eye to women driving or simply did not see the scattered, quick spins around towns.

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