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Clinic in typhoon-hit city overrun with patients

| Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2013, 6:15 p.m.

TACLOBAN, Philippines — A run-down, single-story building with filthy floors at Tacloban's ruined airport has become the area's main medical center for victims of last week's powerful typhoon. It has little medicine, virtually no facilities and very few doctors.

What it is not short of are patients.

Hundreds of injured people, pregnant women, children and the elderly have poured into the squat, white building behind the control tower since Typhoon Haiyan ravaged the eastern Philippines on Friday, killing thousands. Doctors who have been dealing with cuts, fractures and pregnancy complications said on Wednesday they expect to be treating more serious problems such as pneumonia, dehydration, diarrhea and infections.

The medical woes add to the daunting tasks for authorities, including dealing with looters and clearing the bottlenecks holding up thousands of tons of aid material.

“The priority has got to be, let's get the food in, let's get the water in. We got a lot more come in today, but even that won't be enough. We really need to scale up operation in an ongoing basis,” U.N. humanitarian chief Valerie Amos told reporters after touring Talcoban, the capital of Leyte province. Her office has released $25 million in emergency relief funds.

While the cogs of what promises to be a huge international aid effort are beginning to turn, they are not quick enough for the 600,000 who are homeless, hungry and thirsty.

With the Tacloban airport battered and roads made impassable by debris, very little aid has arrived in the city.

Many among the desperate residents have resorted to raiding for food. Mobs overran a rice warehouse on Leyte, collapsing a wall that killed eight people. Thousands of sacks of the grain were carted off. Security forces exchanged gunfire with an armed gang.

Tacloban Mayor Alfred Romualdez urged residents to flee the city because local authorities were having trouble providing food and water, and maintaining order.

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