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Egypt's Islamists mark 100 days of crackdown

| Friday, Nov. 22, 2013, 9:45 p.m.
AFP/Getty Images
Supporters of the Muslim brotherhood carry a comrade injured during clashes with Egyptian riot police in Cairo on Friday, November 22, 2013.

CAIRO — Clashes erupted Friday as thousands of supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood around Egypt held protests marking the passage of 100 days since the start of a bloody crackdown against them in the aftermath of the ouster of Islamist President Mohamed Morsy. The violence left two dead including a 10-year-old boy.

The marches in multiple districts of Cairo and other cities were commemorating the Aug. 14 storming by security forces on two pro-Morsy protest camps in the capital that killed hundreds of Islamists.

In one of the marches, protesters attempted to enter Rabaah al-Adawiya Square, which was the site of the biggest sit-in camp, in an eastern neighborhood of Cairo. Security forces, who had sealed off the square with barbed wire and armored vehicles, drove the protesters off with volleys of tear gas.

The biggest march in Cairo brought out several thousand protesters.

A 10-year-old boy died when he was hit in the head by birdshot in clashes that broke out between Morsy supporters and opponents in the city of Suez, according to Ahmed el-Ansari, the head of Egypt's emergency services.

El-Ansari said a 21-year-old was killed when he was shot in the chest during clashes in eastern Cairo.

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