TribLIVE

| USWorld


 
Larger text Larger text Smaller text Smaller text | Order Photo Reprints

Uruguay OKs 1st national market for legal pot

About The Tribune-Review
The Tribune-Review can be reached via e-mail or at 412-321-6460.
Contact Us | Video | Photo Reprints

Daily Photo Galleries


By The Associated Press

Published: Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2013, 9:51 p.m.

MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay — The nation's senate gave final congressional approval on Tuesday to establish the world's first national marketplace for legal marijuana, an audacious experiment in which the government will oversee production, sales and consumption of a drug illegal almost everywhere else.

The vote was 16 to 13, with the governing Broad Front majority in favor. The plan awaits the signature of President Jose Mujica, who wants the market to begin operating next year.

Two-thirds of Uruguayans oppose a government-run marijuana industry, according to opinion polls. But Mujica said he's convinced the global drug war is a failure and believes bureaucrats can do a better job of containing addictions and beating organized crime than police, soldiers and prison guards.

“Today is an historic day. Many countries of Latin America, and many governments, will take this law as an example,” cheered Sen. Constanza Moreira, voting with the Broad Front majority.

Uruguay's drug control agency will have 120 days, until mid-April, to draft regulations imposing state control over the entire market for marijuana, from seed to smoke.

Everyone involved must be licensed and registered, with government monitors enforcing limits such as the 40 grams a month any adult will be able to buy at pharmacies for any reason or the six marijuana plants that license-holders will be allowed to grow at home.

Congress' lower house approved the bill in late July, and senators rejected all proposed amendments, enforcing party discipline before the debate to assure the outcome.

Former Health Minister Alfredo Solari, a Colorado Party senator, warned on Tuesday that children and adolescents will more easily get their hands on pot and that “the effects of this policy on public health will be terrible.”

But Sen. Roberto Conde, a former deputy foreign minister with the Broad Front, said marijuana “is already established in Uruguay. It's a drug that is already seen as very low risk and enormously easy to get.”

Mujica, a 78-year-old former leftist guerrilla who spent years in jail while many others experimented with marijuana, said the goal is to reduce drug use.

 

 
 


Show commenting policy

Most-Read World

  1. First lady’s absence from trip unsettles Japan
  2. Yemen: Airstrike targets al-Qaida training camps
  3. Abdullah widens lead in Afghan vote tally
  4. Pope pleads for peace, end to starvation, help for needy
  5. On Easter, Syria’s President Assad visits Christian town recaptured from rebels
  6. Ukraine, Russia trade blame for shootout in east
  7. Holocaust survivors taxed, student finds in search of Amsterdam city archives
  8. Ex-army chief, leftist to seek Egyptian presidency
  9. Radio transcript reveals South Korean ferry crew wavered on evacuation
  10. 284 missing, 4 dead in South Korea ferry disaster
  11. Russia’s push into Ukraine leads NATO to increase its Baltics presence
Subscribe today! Click here for our subscription offers.