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Sign-language 'interpreter' pulls off fraud on world stage

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By The Associated Press
Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2013, 9:27 p.m.
 

JOHANNESBURG — As one world leader after another paid homage to Nelson Mandela at a memorial service, the man standing at arm's length from them appeared to interpret their words in sign language. But advocates for the deaf say he was a faker.

The incident, which outraged deaf people and sign-language interpreters watching the service broadcast around the globe, raised questions of how the unidentified man managed to crash a supposedly secure event attended by scores of heads of state, including President Obama.

It also was another example of the problems plaguing the memorial on Tuesday, including public transportation breakdowns that hindered mourners going to the soccer stadium and a faulty audio system that made the speeches inaudible for many. Police failed to search the first wave of crowds who rushed into the stadium when the gates were opened just after dawn.

The man, who stood about a yard from Obama and other leaders, “was moving his hands around, but there was no meaning in what he used his hands for,” said Bruno Druchen, national director of the Deaf Federation of South Africa.

When South African Deputy President Cyril Rampaphosa told the crowd that former South African President F.W. de Klerk was among the guests, the man at his side used a strange pushing motion unknown in sign language that did not identify de Klerk or say anything about his presence, said Ingrid Parkin, principal of the St. Vincent School for the Deaf in Johannesburg.

The closest the man's gestures came to anything in sign language at that point might possibly be the words for “running horse,” “friend” or “beyond,” she said, but only by someone who signs terribly.

The man used virtually no facial expressions to convey the often-emotional speeches, an absolute must for sign-language interpreters, Parkin said.

Collins Chabane, one of South Africa's two presidency ministers, said the government is investigating “alleged incorrect use of sign language at the National Memorial Service” but has not finished because it has been overwhelmed with organizing the public viewing of Mandela's body in Pretoria and his funeral on Sunday in his hometown of Qunu. He did not identify the man, but said the “government will report publicly on any information it may establish.”

Secret Service spokesman Ed Donovan said that “agreed-upon security measures between the U.S. Secret Service and South African government security officials were in place” during the service.

“Program items such as stage participants or sign-language interpreters were the responsibility of the host organizing committee,” Donovan added.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest added: “It's a shame that ... a service that was dedicated to honoring the life and celebrating the legacy of one of the great leaders of the 20th century has gotten distracted by this and a couple of other issues that are far less important than the legacy of Nelson Mandela.”

Four experts, including Druchen and Parkin, said the man was not signing in South African or American sign languages and could not have been signing in any other known sign language because there was no structure to his arm and hand movements.

Nicole Du Toit, a sign-language interpreter who watched the broadcast, said in a telephone interview that the man was an embarrassment for South Africa.

“It was horrible, an absolute circus, really, really bad,” she said. “Only he can understand those gestures.”

The man also did sign interpretation at an event last year that was attended by South African President Jacob Zuma, Druchen said. At that appearance, a deaf person in the audience videotaped the event and gave it to the deaf federation, which analyzed the video, prepared a report and submitted a formal complaint to the governing African National Congress party, Druchen said.

 

 
 


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