Share This Page

Missiles in western Russia legitimate, Moscow claims

| Monday, Dec. 16, 2013, 10:00 p.m.

MOSCOW — Lithuania and Poland expressed concern on Monday about signals that Russia has deployed state-of-the-art missiles in a territory that borders the NATO countries.

The State Department said that it has urged Russia to avoid taking any steps that could destabilize that region.

Russia's Defense Ministry gave an oblique response to a report in the German daily Bild claiming that Russia has sent the Iskander short-range missiles to its westernmost Kaliningrad exclave on the Baltic Sea. The ministry said the missiles had been positioned in an unspecified location in western Russia and argued that the deployment doesn't contradict international treaties.

While the ministry was coy about the location of the missiles, the Kremlin-friendly daily Izvestia, which reportedly has close links to Russian security agencies, said the missiles had been deployed more than a year ago.

Asked about the reported missile deployment, State Department deputy spokeswoman Marie Harf said Washington has “shared with Russia the concerns that countries in the neighborhood have ... regarding Russia's deployment of the Iskander missiles in Kaliningrad.”

“We've urged Moscow to take no steps to destabilize the region,” she said. “We've made that point with them.”

If true, the reports about the Iskander deployment to Kaliningrad would be no surprise.

President Vladimir Putin and Russian officials have talked about such a move for years, casting it as a necessary counterbalance to the development of the U.S.-led NATO missile defense for Europe. Moscow views the missile shield as a threat to its nuclear deterrent.

While the deployment of the Iskander missiles would have little impact on the military balance between Russia and NATO, it could further damage Russia's ties with the West, which have been strained by disputes over the U.S. missile shield, Russia's human rights record and, most recently, Ukraine.

“I am worried about signals that Russia is about to modernize missile systems it has deployed in Kaliningrad,” Lithuanian Defense Minister Juozas Olekas told reporters. “Further militarization of this region, bordering the Baltic states and NATO creates further anxiety, and we will be watching situation there closely.”

The Polish foreign ministry said that while it did not have any official information from Russia, it was concerned about the reports.

“Deployment of Iskander missiles in the Kaliningrad Region would be against the spirit of positive cooperation between Poland and Russia,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Marcin Wojciechowski said.

The Russian Defense Ministry spokesman, Igor Konashenkov, said only that “specific areas of the Iskander missile systems' location in the Western Military District don't violate any international agreements.” The Western Military District includes most provinces in western and northwestern Russia, including the Kaliningrad region.

The Iskander missile, which has a range of up to about 300 miles, travels at hypersonic speeds that make it very difficult to intercept and is capable of hitting targets with a precision of a few meters (yards). It was first used in action in Russia's 2008 war with Georgia.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.