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Israelis attack Gaza Strip

| Tuesday, Dec. 24, 2013, 7:00 p.m.
REUTERS
A Palestinian inspects a Hamas training camp that was hit by an Israeli air strike in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip on Tuesday, Dec. 24, 2013.

GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip — Israeli air and ground forces began a series of attacks on Tuesday on targets across the Gaza Strip, killing a young girl and wounding 10 in response to the deadly shooting of an Israeli civilian by a Palestinian sniper.

It was the heaviest burst of violence in the volatile area since November 2012, when Israel and Hamas' rulers engaged in eight days of heavy fighting. The sudden flare-up threatened a cease-fire that halted that fighting and which largely has held up for the past 13 months.

“I recommend to Hamas not to test our patience and to assert its authority,” Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon said. “If there isn't quiet in Israel, there won't be quiet in the Gaza Strip.”

The Israeli military said aircraft, tanks and infantry targeted “terror sites” in Gaza, including a weapons-manufacturing facility, “terror infrastructure” and a concealed rocket launcher.

“Direct hits were confirmed,” it said.

Palestinian officials reported at least 16 Israeli attacks, causing a series of loud explosions across the territory in rapid succession. Hamas ordered its forces to evacuate offices and compounds and redeploy to safer sites.

Hamas Health Ministry official Ashraf al-Kidra said an airstrike in central Gaza killed a 3-year-old girl and wounded three relatives, including two young siblings. In all, 10 people were wounded, he said. He said an earlier report of a second death was wrong, and that the wounded man was in serious condition at a hospital.

Hamas spokesman Sami Abu Zuhri condemned what he called “cowardly” Israeli attacks. “The occupation will not terrify the Palestinian people by these actions and will not punish our resistance and will not halt its readiness to respond to any attacks on Gaza,” he said.

Israel began the airstrikes shortly after a Gaza sniper shot an Israeli civilian laborer as he performed maintenance work on the border fence. The man was airlifted to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

The incident occurred as Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was visiting the nearby town of Sderot, a frequent target of Palestinian attacks, to inaugurate a rail line.

“This is a very severe incident and we will not let it go unanswered,” Netanyahu said. “Our policy until now has been to act beforehand and to respond in force, and this is how we will act regarding this incident as well.”

Lt. Col. Peter Lerner, an Israeli military spokesman, expressed hope that the quiet would be restored but said the military remained ready for any scenario.

“We're not looking for an escalation on the border with Gaza,” he said. “But we're not willing to have shots fired at us from across the fence, killing our civilians.”

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