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Syria's latest assault on city kills 20

| Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014, 9:24 p.m.

At least 20 people were killed on Wednesday in Aleppo when a residential building was hit by a rocket from a warplane as the government's daily bombardment of the northern Syrian city continued, activists said.

More than 500 people have been killed across Aleppo province in two weeks of a fierce government offensive with rockets and destructive barrel bombs, doctors and human rights groups reported.

World leaders have called for an end to the attacks, which have put into question the upcoming Geneva II peace conference.

The main political opposition group, the Syrian National Coalition, has said it will boycott the talks if the bombing does not end.

“You can't imagine these tools of death,” said Khalid Omar, a member of the Union of Free Medicine in Aleppo.

Syrian forces launched mortar shells Wednesday at a border village in neighboring Lebanon and wounded 10 Syrian refugees, one critically, Lebanese state media reported.

Abu Hamzeh, a rebel fighter in nearby Arsal, said the mortar rounds struck two cars carrying refugees, killing a woman and her child.

On Monday, the Lebanese army fired on Syrian government aircraft that officials said had launched missiles at the same border village, Khirbet Daoud.

It marked the first military response by Lebanon to occasional Syrian shelling and attacks.

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